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NGPLI

Outreach to Muslim Students in Kyrgyzstan

Alima, Next Generation Professional Leader from Kyrgyzstan

Alima is a young Christian professional in Kyrgyzstan who teaches math to primarily Muslim students. After attending one of Mission Eurasia’s Next Generation Professional Leader’s Initiatives (NGPLI) forums in Bishkek, Alima was encouraged and filled with new conviction and ideas for sharing the gospel through her profession. She shared her story with us: “I am a math teacher at a Christian school in Kyrgyzstan. I’ve always had a penchant for numbers, and when I had to choose between working as an accountant or a math teacher, I chose to be a teacher because I wanted to be able to connect with students. Moreover, I believe that, as a Christian, my calling is to work professionally while also building relationships with people so I can share my faith. “I am a second generation teacher, as my mother was also a teacher. My father worked in technology and was considered a master…

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Mission in Profession: A Young Doctor’s Testimony

Next Generation professional leader in Armenia

“I know that God had a plan for me before I was even born,” shares Naira, a School Without Walls student from Armenia. “My family was very poor when my mother found out she was pregnant with me, so they advised her to terminate her pregnancy. But God had a different plan, and my mother decided to keep me. I know that my birth was God’s will, and I have seen Him work in every stage of my life. I could see His hand in my admission to medical school and my decision to become a doctor. “Difficult life circumstances often make us feel distant from God. Unfortunately, I experienced this in my own life, and I turned away from my faith for a few years. When I wasn’t walking with the Lord, Aram, the local School Without Walls coordinator, invited my sister and I to a youth camp, which…

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Fearless Faith: Christian Leaders in Tajikistan

School Without Walls session in Tajikistan

“Evangelical churches in our country are not very numerous, but we aspire to impact our society and we are grateful to School Without Walls for their help in this,” shared Arash (name changed), a national School Without Walls (SWW) coordinator for Tajikistan, speaking to 80 young Next Generation Christian leaders at a Next Generation Professional Leaders Initiative (NGPLI) conference last week. Tajikistan is over 90% Muslim, and Christians who openly share their faith risk persecution from their families, in the educational system, and from employers. Therefore, the goal of the conference was to pass on a vision of influential Christianity to these young Tajik Christians and to inspire and teach them how to be witnesses for Christ and transform their society through treating their workplace as a mission field. Bahram (name changed), a university student, shared how the conference’s message impacted him: “It’s not easy being a Christian in our…

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Impacting Uzbekistan for Christ

Shahrat (name changed for safety), Christian businessman from Uzbekistan

Even though Christians in Uzbekistan often suffer religious persecution at the hands of local authorities, the School Without Walls (SWW) coordinator in the capital city of Tashkent, and a group of SWW graduates, organized a round table discussion on the Next Generation Professional Leaders Initiative (NGPLI) for 35 young professionals from four different churches. The lack of religious freedom in Uzbekistan makes NGPLI even more relevant in that context, as traditional means of sharing the Gospel are very risky. “I’m prepared to go out of my way to help my clients resolve problems with our product. I do my work well and respect my clients. They see this and value it,” shared Shahrat (name changed), a Christian businessman who spoke about the impact his faith has had in his professional context. “I never hide my faith, and my good relationship with my clients allows me to share the Gospel with…

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Shaping the Culture: Christian Professionals in Kyrgyzstan

Next Generation professional leaders in Central Asia

 “When I first started working, I had to choose whether to be an accountant or a teacher, and I chose to be a teacher, because I wanted to impact young people’s lives,” shares Nargiza (name changed), a math teacher from Kyrgyzstan who attended Mission Eurasia’s Next Generation Professional Leaders Initiative (NGPLI) Forum in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan in November. “My parents were also teachers, and my father was considered a master at his craft. From them, I learned the value of hard work, and from the Bible, I learned that my work should be glorifying to God. There is a great need for the gospel in the intellectual environment that I work in, and the best way to respond to this need is by talking with people. God has entrusted me with my students, and I believe He has called me to use my job for ministry, which is a great responsibility….

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