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Outreach to Muslim Students in Kyrgyzstan

Alima is a young Christian professional in Kyrgyzstan who teaches math to primarily Muslim students. After attending one of Mission Eurasia’s Next Generation Professional Leader’s Initiatives (NGPLI) forums in Bishkek, Alima was encouraged and filled with new conviction and ideas for sharing the gospel through her profession. She shared her story with us:

“I am a math teacher at a Christian school in Kyrgyzstan. I’ve always had a penchant for numbers, and when I had to choose between working as an accountant or a math teacher, I chose to be a teacher because I wanted to be able to connect with students. Moreover, I believe that, as a Christian, my calling is to work professionally while also building relationships with people so I can share my faith.

“I am a second generation teacher, as my mother was also a teacher. My father worked in technology and was considered a master of his craft. From my parents I learned the value of working hard, and from the Bible I learned that my work should glorify Christ. The intellectual environment that I work in has a huge need for the gospel, and the best way to respond to this need is by talking with people. God has entrusted me with my profession, and I believe that this profession is also my ministry. It is a great responsibility to share the truth of the gospel with others.

“The NGPLI forum in Bishkek touched me deeply, and I was freed from the guilt I used to feel because I didn’t think I could serve God through my job. It also helped me understand that work is an opportunity for ministry, and along with working hard, I also need to stand by my values, even if it’s detrimental to me professionally. My colleagues recognize me as a disciple of Christ, not because they see me at church (they don’t attend), but because of my work ethic and compassionate interactions with them. The NGPLI forum also helped to further establish my belief that my main focus should be people, because God has given them great value.

“The children at my school are from Muslim families; therefore I try to be a blessing whenever I talk with my students and their parents. The parents trust me, because they know I want to provide quality education, and because they trust me as an educator, they are also more likely to trust what I say about God. For me, it’s important that I have a mentor to inspire my work, so I always think about how Jesus would teach. We young Christian professionals have a great responsibility to work well in the midst of a system where people want to work less and receive more. I don’t work like this, because I believe that I am working for the Lord, and I hope this serves as an example for others.

“During the Soviet era, it was almost impossible for believers to pursue higher education and work in influential professions. Moreover, many people were afraid of evangelical churches, because they considered them to be sects. But today, much has changed, and sometimes people come to my church and sit through the service just so they can talk with lawyers who attend the church. I have even heard stories of people repenting after hearing the gospel while they were waiting during the service! This is a perfect example of how professionals add prestige to a community, and the Church is no longer afraid, because they know there are influential Christians in our society. And this is also an example of how we are called to bring the gospel to our nation through our professions.”

Please give today to support the gospel work of Next Generation Christian professionals in Central Asia, like Alima, who are courageously transforming their societies with the Good News: